Physicists confirm existence of new type of meson

Captured From: http://phys.org  Physicists in the College of Arts and Sciences at Syracuse University have made several important discoveries regarding the basic structure of mesons—subatomic particles long thought to be composed of one quark and one antiquark and bound together by a strong interaction. Recently, Professor Tomasz Skwarnicki and a team of researchers proved the existence of a meson named Z(4430), with two quarks and two antiquarks, using data from the Large Hadron Collidor beauty (LHCb) Collaboration at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. This tetraquark state was first discovered in Japan in 2007 but was later disputed by a team of researchers … More

Is time quantized? In other words, is there a fundamental unit of time that could not be divided into a briefer unit?

Captured From: http://www.scientificamerican.com Another, somewhat iconoclastic perspective on this question comes from William G. Tifft, a professor of astronomy at the University of Arizona: “There are several ways to answer this question. 1) There is no conclusive evidence that time is quantized, but 2) certain theoretical studies suggest that in order to unify general relativity (gravitation) with the theories of quantum physics that describe fundamental particles and forces, it may be necessary to quantize space and perhaps time as well. Time is always a 1-dimensional quantity in this case. 3) My own work, which combines new theoretical ideas with observations of … More

Radiation from early universe may help prove Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity

Captured From: http://www.dnaindia.com Researchers have measured the minute gravitational distortions in polarized radiation from the early universe and discovered that these ancient microwaves can provide a cosmological test of Einstein’s theory of general relativity. These measurements have the potential to narrow down the estimates for the mass of ghostly subatomic particles known as neutrinos. The radiation could even provide physicists with clues to another outstanding problem about our universe: how the invisible “dark matter” and “dark energy,” which has been undetectable through modern telescopes, may be distributed throughout the universe. The UC San Diego scientists measured variations in the polarization of … More